Tips for choosing domain name from experts

Make it pronounceable

This tip is closely related to our first bit of advice. Even though users aren't likely to be saying your domain name out loud, pronounceability is still important. This is because of something called processing fluency: the ease with which our brains can process information. Names that don't require a person to think too hard are usually the easiest to remember, and also more likely to inspire positive associations. 'If you have to spell it over the phone, you've lost.' says Jason Calacanis, the serial entrepreneur and angel investor behind tech giants like Uber, the Launch Festival, and This Week in Startups. When people routinely misspell your domain name because it's too hard to figure out, all of that potential traffic is lost. Most people will give up searching for your brand's site quickly; they don't have the time or desire to try multiple Google searches of possible spellings. The lesson here is simple: make it easy for your customers to find you! - Denis Pinsky - Forbes


Build your brand

If you can't find a good domain that meets the previous rule, use branding to distinguish yourself. Using a unique moniker is a great way to build additional value. Take note that, because of this need for brand-building, you'll likely be slower to gain traction than if you used a more simple and straightforward domain. But, if done correctly, the effort can pay off in the long run. - Ryan Shelley - Search Engine Land


Make it easy to pronounce and spell

You should be able to easily share your domain when speaking as well as writing. You never know when you'll be asked to share your domain name in person. It should be easy to understand and spell for any listener. - wpbeginner


Short and sweet

The shorter the better. Enough said. - Amy Lynn Andrews


Go with .com

Most of the time internet users assume .com when browsing. Having a .net, .info, .tv or any other extension puts another potential roadblock in the process of finding you. Having said that, there are plenty of successful sites that use a .net extension (or something else), but a .com is ideal. - Amy Lynn Andrews


Think Long-Term

Are you ready to marry your domain? You should be, because it will be one of the biggest elements that defines your business and brand for years. Plus, if you decide to change the domain in the future, it will cost you money, branding, and SEO rankings. In short, it's a huge pain. So, when you choose your domain, think long-term. For example, if your company helps businesses optimize their websites for SEO, you could choose a domain name like, 'OptimizedSEO.com' But if you think there's a chance you might expand to more general digital marketing services in the future, like email marketing, PPC, etc. then it might be wise to reconsider your domain name. You don't want to pin yourself down to a certain niche if you think you might expand out of that niche. So, keep your long-term vision in mind when picking your domain name. - ROBERT MENING - WebsiteSetup


Target your area

If your business is local, consider including your city or state in your domain name to make it easy for local customers to find and remember. Example: PhoenixGlassRepair.com. - Andrea Rowland - GoDaddy


Avoid numbers and hyphens

Numbers and hyphens are often misunderstood - people who hear your website address don't know if you're using a numeral (5) or it's spelled out (five) or they misplace or forget the dash. If you need these in your domain, register the different variations to be safe - Andrea Rowland - GoDaddy


Keep it short

While keywords are important, don't go overboard with domain length. It's better to have a domain name that's short and memorable. It's a good idea to keep your domain name under 15 characters. Longer domains are harder for your users to remember. Not to mention, users will also be more prone to entering typos with longer domain names, and you'll lose out on that traffic. That's why it's a good idea to keep your domain length short. - wpbeginner


Lock the Domain So It CanÍt Be Stolen

Even though it may seem odd at first, domain hijacking actually happens more often than you'd imagine. Not going into the boring technical details, your domain can be stolen via several means. Most commonly, this involves either hacking your password or convincing you to give out your password via a phishing attack, plus some other fun things. Basically, if someone gains access to your registrar's user account, they can do whatever they wish with your domains. Some domain registrars offer a feature in which they keep your domain in Registrar-lock status, which prevents unauthorized attempts at domain transfers. In this state, your registration information and DNS configuration cannot be changed until you unlock your domain name. Luckily, enabling this option is often very easy and only requires you to select a specific box in your registrar's user panel. - Karol K - Winning WP


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